Lewis County's Leading Newspaper Since 1867
Weston, West Virginia



After Paris, Empty Symbolism

The instant online symbol of global support for Paris after last week's attacks was a roughly rendered peace symbol with an Eiffel Tower in the middle of it. The French designer Jean Jullien sketched it as soon as he heard the news of the atrocity. He called it "Peace for Paris," and it immediately became a sensation on social media.
Its success is a sign of the times. We have become experts at treacly online mourning. We take grotesque atrocities and launder them into trite symbols and slogans that are usually self-congratulatory and, of course, wholly ineffectual. The 19th-century author William Dean Howells once said, "Yes, what the American public wants is a tragedy with a happy ending." On social media, the happy ending is the widely shared and tweeted image or hashtag.
After the slaughter at the offices of the satirical French magazine Charlie Hebdo earlier this year, it was "Je suis Charlie," or "I am Charlie." It was a well-intentioned expression of solidarity, so long as you overlooked the absurd presumption of it.
You are Charlie? Oh, OK. Then draw a sketch of Muhammad and post it online. Better yet, do it over and over again, until you get constant threats and your office is firebombed, just as a warmup. No, you aren't Charlie (for that matter, Charlie isn't even Charlie anymore -- it's given up on mocking Islam for understandable safety reasons).
The "Peace for Paris" image is simple and emotive, if inapt. Paris doesn't need to give peace a chance. It doesn't need to make love, not war. It doesn't need to be more understanding or more hopeful. It needs to be better protected by all those unsentimental means that have been neglected in recent years, or overwhelmed by the growing threat of ISIS.
Paris -- and more broadly France and the West -- needs more surveillance of suspected terrorists and police raids; a more restrictive immigration policy that doesn't create large, unassimilated Muslim populations, or welcome terrorists as refugees; and a serious, multilayered campaign to destroy ISIS and deny it the safe havens from which it recruits and trains, and plots against the West.
If someone can come up with a catchy symbol for that, I'll embrace it (although "La Marseillaise" isn't so bad: "To arms citizens/Form your battalions/March, march"). Meanwhile, spare me the #PrayforParis hashtag. Forgive me if I'm unmoved by lighting up world landmarks in red, white and blue, or your putting a tricolor filter on your Facebook profile picture. And please don't tell me, in the words of the designer Jean Jullien, that "in all this horror there's something positive that people are coming together in a sense of unity and peace."
Nothing positive comes from innocents getting shot down in cold blood for the offense of going to a concert on a Friday night. If there aren't going to be more -- and worse -- attacks in our cities, the path ahead won't be one of unity and peace. It will be the hard, thankless work of protecting civilization from its enemies.

Rich Lowry is editor of the National Review.

(c) 2015 by King Features Synd., Inc.






















Search Now:
Amazon Advertisement
The Weston Democrat 306 Main Avenue Weston, WV 26452 Office: (304) 269-1600 Fax: (304) 269-4035 E-mail: news@westondemocrat.com

Send mail to webmaster@westondemocrat.com with questions or comments about this web site.
[Legal Notice: Terms of Use for the Weston Democrat Web Site]
Copyright © 2007 The Weston Democrat
Designed by WV PC Doc, Inc.